decide

decide, determine, settle, rule, resolve mean to come or to cause to come to a conclusion.
Decide presupposes previous consideration of a matter causing doubt, wavering, debate, or controversy and implies the arriving at a more or less logical conclusion that brings doubt or debate to an end: the word may take as its subject the person or persons arriving at such a conclusion or the thing or things that bring them to the conclusion
{

the time for deliberation has then passed. He has decidedJohn Marshall

}
{

this exordium, and Miss Pross's two hands in quite agonized entreaty clasping his, decided Mr. Cruncher— Dickens

}
{

the . . . mistress of the household referred to her whether we should have another round or go in to supper. Of course, she always decided as she supposed the hostess wished— Jefferies

}
{

it should disturb the complacency of those network officials who decided . . . that not enough people were watching to justify the expense— Seldes

}
Determine (see also DISCOVER 2) may mean to set limits or bounds to: when it means basically to decide, this implication of definitely fixing something so that its identity, its character, its scope, its direction is clear and beyond doubt distinguishes it from decide; one decides to give a dinner party but determines the guests to be invited; a legislature decides that the state constitution should be revised and appoints a committee with power to determine what changes shall be made. In a slightly different sense determine implies the arrival at a conclusion that either is a fixed and unalterable purpose or intention
{

can you weep [i.e., move by weeping] fate from its determined purpose?— Middleton

}
{

she was . . . obviously tormented by shyness, but as obviously determined to conquer it— Mackenzie

}
or is the inevitable result, outcome, or end of what precedes
{

what we notice determines what we do; what we do again determines what we experience— James

}
{

their civilization was one of "city-states," not of kingdoms and empires; and their whole political outlook was necessarily determined by this condition— Dickinson

}
Settle implies the arrival at a conclusion, often a mental or logical conclusion but sometimes a termination for which no individual is responsible, that brings to an end all doubt, all wavering, all dispute
{

the Supreme Court of the United States has power to settle all questions of law

}
{

time has settled few or none of the essential points of dispute— Henry Adams

}
{

death settled all their problems

}
Rule (see also GOVERN) implies a decision or determination by authority, especially by the authority of the court
{

the judge ruled that the question was in-, admissible

}
Resolve implies an expressed or clear decision or determination to do or refrain from doing something
{

resolve to get up earlier in the mornings

}
{

resolve to give up smoking

}
{

he was resolved to win through to fortune, but he must first discover his tools— Buchan

}
Analogous words: conclude, judge, gather (see INFER): *judge, adjudge, adjudicate
Contrasted words: vacillate, waver, *hesitate, falter

New Dictionary of Synonyms. 2014.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • décidé — décidé, ée [ deside ] adj. • 1725; de décider 1 ♦ Qui n hésite pas pour prendre un parti, pour décider; qui a de la décision. ⇒ décider (IV); déterminé, 1. ferme, hardi, résolu, volontaire. Un homme décidé. Par ext. Un air décidé. ⇒ 2. crâne. Une …   Encyclopédie Universelle

  • DECIDE — Saltar a navegación, búsqueda «DECIDE» Sencillo de HΛL del álbum Violation of the rules Publicación 25 de octubre de 2000 Formato Maxi single …   Wikipedia Español

  • decide — de·cide vb de·cid·ed, de·cid·ing vt: to determine (as a case or issue) by making a decision (as a final judgment): adjudicate (1, 2) compare find, hold vi: to make a decision …   Law dictionary

  • decide — DECÍDE, decíd, vb. III. 1. intranz. şi refl. A lua o hotărâre; a alege (între mai multe alternative), a se fixa (între mai multe posibilităţi). ♦ tranz. A hotărî, a soluţiona în mod definitiv. 2. tranz. A determina, a convinge, a îndupleca pe… …   Dicționar Român

  • décidé — décidé, ée (dé si dé, dée) part. passé. 1°   Dont la solution est donnée. Cette question va être décidée. 2°   Qui n a rien de vague, d incertain. Le ministère louvoie, il n a pas de marche décidée. Cette musique n a point un caractère décidé.… …   Dictionnaire de la Langue Française d'Émile Littré

  • Decide! — (Decidere!) was an Italian libertarian political association led by Daniele Capezzone. The group was sometimes also referred to as Decidere.net, in reference to its official website. It was one of the founding members of Silvio Berlusconi s The… …   Wikipedia

  • decide — [dē sīd′, disīd′] vt. decided, deciding [ME deciden < L decidere, to cut off, decide < de , off, from + caedere, to cut: see CIDE] 1. to end (a contest, dispute, etc.) by giving one side the victory or by passing judgment 2. to make up one… …   English World dictionary

  • Decide — De*cide , v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Decided}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Deciding}.] [L. dec[=i]dere; de + caedere to cut, cut off; prob. akin to E. shed, v.: cf. F. d[ e]cider. Cf. {Decision}.] 1. To cut off; to separate. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] Our seat denies… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Decide — De*cide , v. i. To determine; to form a definite opinion; to come to a conclusion; to give decision; as, the court decided in favor of the defendant. [1913 Webster] Who shall decide, when doctors disagree? Pope. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • decide — late 14c., to settle a dispute, from O.Fr. decider, from L. decidere to decide, determine, lit. to cut off, from de off (see DE (Cf. de )) + caedere to cut (see CEMENT (Cf. cement)). For L. vowel change, see ACQUISITION …   Etymology dictionary

Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”

We are using cookies for the best presentation of our site. Continuing to use this site, you agree with this.